Top 5 Hair Care Myths You Are Tired Of Hearing!

We know you desire to have hairs like the one shown in fairytales –long, healthy, smooth and shinier hairs. And to achieve this you have surfed the internet for tips and tricks to grow long and healthy hairs fast but what if you have been misguided by product pages and other solutions.

It’s time to decode the hair facts by bursting the ‘forever’ running hair myths.

If you are also one of those who have trimmed your hairs often or continuously changed shampoos for the perfect texture and growth, you are not alone! To help you get the best, healthiest and smooth hair ever, we’re taking the curtain off from the 5 most common hair myths below correcting them with some actual facts.

#1 Myth

CUTTING YOUR HAIR OFTEN BOOSTS GROWTH

Probably you have heard this a million times but it’s time to look at the science behind it. Hair grows from the follicles found in the scalp, and so cutting or trimming your hair has nothing to do with the growth. 

Cutting or trimming the ends just eliminate split ends from your hairs, making it look thicker, healthier and shinier. Ideally, one should go for trimming after every 12 weeks according to your hair growth.

#2 Myth

BRUSH YOUR HAIR 100 TIMES A DAY

Honestly, do we really have time for this? 100 strokes a day is way too much. Brushing is a form of friction and if done in excess will damage the hair and make it look frizzy.

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Even brushing your hair with too much force or a poorly designed hairbrush can cause breakage. 

However, brush your hair gently to smooth out the tangles, stimulate scalp circulation and help distribute hairs’ natural oils. But again, not 100 strokes a day, please!

#3 Myth

KEEP CHANGING YOUR SHAMPOO

It depends on you! Finding the right shampoo can be tricky and the results in few trials might show an error. However, if you are using a great combination of products that work for you, continue with that.

Don’t be afraid to switch it. There are so many products that might persuade you but the decision to change the products shall only be made when you experience a change in hair needs.

For example, if you have colored, straightened or chemically treated your hair, moved to a different climate, etc. In that case, it’s the right time to match your hair routine with your current hair.

#4 Myth

SLEEPING WITH HAIR LOOSE HELPS HAIR GROW

While the fairytales of long, full hair might have conjured you, we are sorry to say but this hair care tip is nothing more than fiction. Sleeping with your hair tied or wrapped helps prevent breakage or damage.

SLEEPING WITH HAIR LOOSE HELPS HAIR GROW

Tie your hair in a loose ponytail so it holds together and isn’t super tight to make you and the scalp uncomfortable.

You can also use a bit of leave-in conditioner to repair the hair and give it extra shine and softness for the next day.

#5 Myth

STRESS CAUSES GRAY HAIR

If this would have been true, all of us would be having gray hairs after high school. However, it’s not true and totally unscientific. Graying is a multivariable equation determined mostly by genetics and ageing. 

When the cells that produce your hair pigment –melanin –no longer produce color, your hair starts growing gray.

There is no proof that stress causes graying of hair but it may accelerate the growth phase and after some months you might experience the fallout of hair and later when new hairs grow, they may be gray.

If any of these myths sound familiar to you, we are glad to clear the fog from your eyes. Now that you know what’s really right, you can easily move forward with better hair care tips that actually show results.

Every hair texture and type is different and hence, requires certain modifications while choosing a hair care regime, but the roots of haircare are true universally –it’s not just about hair but the SCALP too!

The facts are in front of you, go and share with your friends and tell them, “it’s all in the head”.

Heard of any other hair myths? Do let us know, let’s burst them together!

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