Why You Should Track Your Period?

Menstruation is a part of every women's life from early adolescence until menopause in their 40s and 50s, whether you name it your monthly visitor, your period, or one of many other creative euphemisms.

It's easy to become complacent in tracking this biological process due to its everyday nature.

Below are the pointers to motivate you for keeping a regular check on your periods.

Marking-Days-During-Periods

It Tells What Is Regular For You.

Knowing what's normal for your moods is one of those extra perks. We've all experienced low moods for a few days before realising why when our period arrives - but tracking can eliminate the guesswork.

As per reports, your period can alter your energy levels, emotions, food cravings, and exercise habits, in addition to your hair, complexion, and daily skincare routine.

Perhaps most importantly, your cycle may indicate underlying health concerns such as PCOS or endometriosis if you track your period over several months.

It Assists You In Customizing Your Exercise Routine.

You've probably noticed that you get more energy during various times of the month, and that boost in energy could be due to your periods.

Knowing when these lifts and dips happen could help you plan your workouts better. Definitely a win-win situation!

Tracking your activity, as well as your energy levels, will help you better understand which days are best for training and which days are best for rest.

However, strength training in the initial half of your cycle leads to greater increases in muscle strength than training in the second half of your cycle, following ovulation.

It Help You Moderate Sleep Pattern

People with premenstrual mood disorders are more likely to experience sleep problems like insomnia, hypersomnia, fatigue, and even disturbing dreams which could be due to a disruption in their circadian rhythms.

As a result, keeping track of your period can help you figure out how your sleep patterns change during your cycle, allowing you to adjust your activities accordingly.

It's also crucial to note that sleep might be disrupted by other life stages like stress, pregnancy and premenopausal and menopausal symptoms.

It Help You Understand Your Hunger/ Cravings

We all know the feeling of craving chocolates once our period arrives, but by tracking your entire cycle you might start to notice patterns like when you crave salty, comfort or even healthy food.

Food cravings are a frequent symptom of PMS. There is also evidence that some people seek consolation from junk foods when they are distressed emotionally.

There's evidence that the luteal phase (second part of your menstruation cycle) contributes to increased sweet cravings, and there's also some evidence that the luteal phase contributes to increased salt cravings.

Chocolate cravings before and during the period are the most well-documented cycle-related sweet cravings.


Concluding Note:

You should at the very least keep track of the first day of your period each month. This information should be sufficient to alert you.

Period tracking, on the other hand, can get quite sophisticated. Keeping track of these facts allows you and your doctor to keep a closer eye on your health, as well as prepare you for other menstrual symptoms.

The more familiar you are with your own body and its cycles, the easier it will be to notice when something is wrong.

For example, do you have a couple of days of heavy flow followed by a day or two of spotting during your period? If that's the case, you'll probably need a different pad or tampon strength throughout your period.

Anticipating these requirements can make things a lot easier for you.

When starting a new workout regimen, gaining or losing a considerable amount of weight, or simply going through a stressful period, women frequently skip periods or have menstrual fluctuations. 

When a typical menstrual cycle becomes irregular, it could be a sign of a hormone or thyroid problem, liver function issues, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes, or a variety of other illnesses.

Not only that, but a change in the menstruation cycle is frequently the initial indication of a variety of women's health problems, some of which have no evident link to the reproductive organs.

Keep a clear track of your menstrual cycle to deal with health abnormalities before they become severe for you.

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